Friday, 29 October 2010

Let’s put it to bed……not brush it under the carpet.


The new party line concerning the unlawful suspension of the former Police Chief Graham Power QPM is “it’s time this was put to bed”. Most of us agree with this statement, including Deputy Bob Hill, who has lodged a proposition P166/2010 in order to do this.

But there is a big difference between putting something to bed, and brushing it under the carpet. P166/2010 sets out to differentiate the two.

What the Deputy of St Martin appears to be trying to achieve with this proposition, is accountability, openness and to give our States Members the opportunity to show the public that they are not willing just to brush this stuff under the carpet anymore. If people in high places have acted less than honorably then they should be held to account.

The proposition gives our elected "representatives" to prove to their electors, and the island as a whole, the chance to restore some much needed faith and confidence in them. Will they take this opportunity, or will they carry on the good old "Jersey way? If they choose the latter, then Chief Minister Terry Le Sueur and Home Affairs Minister Senator Ian Le Marquand had better brace themselves for plenty more "ground hog days". There are far too many unanswered questions which leads to immense distrust of those involved. Put it to bed? YES. Sweep it under the carpet? There's no room left under there it can't be an opition.

It's time for Terry Le Sueur to show some real "leadership" and it's time for our elected "representatives" to compel him to do it!

PROPOSITION

THE STATES are asked to decide whether they are of opinion -
(a) to request the Chief Minister to inform States members in a Report
presented to the Assembly, or in a Statement to the Assembly, of the
action he has already taken and the action he intends to take in respect
of the report dated 10th September 2010 into the suspension of the
former Chief Officer of the States of Jersey Police prepared for the
Chief Minister by Mr. Brian Napier QC (‘the Napier Report’) and, in
particular to provide information in respect of the following matters –

(i) what action, if any, the Chief Minister has taken in respect of
the destruction by the Chief Executive to the Council of
Ministers of the original notes he took during the suspension
meeting and what guidelines, if any, the Chief Minister has
issued regarding the records of suspension meetings in the
future;

(ii) whether he accepts the conclusion set out in paragraphs 45,
67, 72 and 107 of the Napier Report that action was taken on
a basis which was contrary to the advice of the Law Officers
and what action, if any, he has taken or proposes to take in
respect of that matter;

(iii) whether he accepts the conclusion set out in paragraphs 49–53, 55, 58–66, 107 and 108 of the Napier Report that the suspension process did not meet the requirements of the Disciplinary Code for the Chief Officer, issued under Article 9(1) of the Police Force (Jersey) Law 1974 as part of the Chief Officer’s terms and conditions, and what action, if any, he has taken regarding the apparent breach of the process specified in the Code;

(iv) why there has been no formal presentation of the report to members and no opportunity to discuss the findings with the author?

(v) what training, procedural and other corrective measures, if any, he has taken in order to ensure that personnel issues, and in particular disciplinary issues, are managed appropriately in the future;

(vi) whether any disciplinary proceedings have been taken as a result of the findings of the Napier Report and, if so, to update members on the outcome of those proceedings;

(b) to request the Chief Minister to issue a formal apology to the retired Chief Officer of the States of Jersey Police in relation to the failure of those involved, as identified in the Napier Report, to deal with the Chief Officer’s suspension in accordance with the procedures set out in the Disciplinary Code;

(c) to request the Chief Minister to present the Napier Report to the States in accordance with the provisions of Standing Order 37.

DEPUTY OF ST. MARTIN


REPORT

This report and proposition is not seeking a vote of no-confidence. Neither is it intended to invite Members to do anything exceptional or beyond the customary political process. It is intended to invite Members to formally require the Chief Minister to do what may be seen as an inherent part of his role. Namely, to account to Members for his actions as Jersey’s Chief Minister. Members are not being invited to condemn his actions. Members are simply being invited to compel him to do what is required of him within our political system. This request is brought as a formal proposition because, in spite of repeated requests, the Chief Minister has declined to discharge this responsibility on a less formal basis. It is hoped that the proposition may gain support from all sections of the House. Whatever divisions may exist from a political perspective, it is hoped that all members will see value in demonstrating their willingness to exercise this basic democratic function.

What is being requested is straightforward and simple. The Chief Minister is being asked to tell Members, and thereby the people of the Island, what action he has so far taken in response to the Napier report and what action he proposes to take in the future. In particular, the Chief Minister should state, in an unequivocal manner, what action he has taken, or now proposes to take, in respect of the actions of the Chief Executive to the Council of Ministers. The Chief Executive’s role is not comparable to other positions in the public sector. Members may, for example, be told that it is normal for disciplinary issues to be covered by confidentiality. That may be appropriate in respect of most public sector employees. Members may, however, be prepared to agree that the position of Chief Executive to the Council of Ministers cannot be regarded in the same way as other public employees. His position as the most senior public servant in the Island is pivotal to the good governance of Jersey. It is not sufficient for the post-holder to have the confidence of the Chief Minister and his senior colleagues. That confidence must be shared by the wider political community and to some extent the public at large. And yet the Chief Executive cannot be accountable to States Members or the whole community. He is accountable to the Council of Ministers, led by the Chief Minister, and the Chief Minister is himself accountable to the States for his oversight of the Chief Executive’s role. That is how our political system works. Normally this arrangement operates with co-operation and goodwill. On this occasion, neither has been demonstrated by the Chief Minister and it is therefore up to Members to determine whether it will use its powers to compel the Chief Minister to operate within the customary process. If we are not so willing, then so be it. But should that be the case, then it would appear that our system of political accountability has broken down.

Members will be familiar with the report by Brian Napier QC relating to the suspension from duty of the former Chief Officer of the States Police, and some of the significant criticisms made in that report in respect of the fairness of the process, the evidence relied upon, and the extent to which the key participants appear to have acted contrary to the advice of the Law Officers’ Department. Unusually for a report commissioned on behalf of the States, Mr. Napier was not asked to set out specific recommendations for the future. Nor, we are told, will he be attending the Island to present his report and answer questions. From enquiries I have made, I understand it to be the clear position of both the Chief Minister and Mr. Napier that no such attendance will take place and no questions addressed to Mr. Napier in relation to his report will be answered. It is therefore for the States to determine the obvious issue of what we do in the light of the report. If failings are identified, what is to be done to address these failings and who is responsible to the States for ensuring that the appropriate corrective action is taken?

In normal circumstances this task would be addressed by a simple act of good management and leadership. The sponsor of the Report would be tasked with producing an action plan, setting out responsibilities and timescales, and Members could from time to time enquire as to progress. There is nothing remarkable about such a procedure. It is normal competent management of the public sector. What is, however, distinctly abnormal about the present situation is the apparent refusal of the Chief Minister to undertake any such process. When challenged on the actions he intends to take in consequence of the report commissioned by the States, the Chief Minister has commonly expressed a wish to “move on”. Members may agree that it is difficult to see how “moving on” can be achieved when so many issues are left hanging in the air. In order to achieve closure, issues must be addressed and resolved. “Moving on” and “hoping for it to go away” are different things. The former may be achieved with leadership and skill. The latter will not achieve closure, and will serve only to bring further discredit upon the Island and the conduct of its affairs. It is for this, and related reasons, that the proposition is brought. This saga has now been running for over 2 years at considerable financial and political cost. It has also caused untold disruption and suffering to the former Chief Officer of the States of Jersey Police, and there is anecdotal evidence that it has undermined the confidence of the victims and survivors of abuse in the operational independence of the criminal justice process.

All sides hope to bring this long-running issue to an end. In this respect I have a plan set out in this proposition. The Chief Minister prefers to hope for it to go away. It should be recalled that this is the same Chief Minister who denied the former Police Chief details of when the suspension letters were drafted, until, after almost a year, he was compelled to reveal the truth following a Board of Administration Appeal Hearing. However, it is for the House to decide which approach they most prefer to be associated.

It is not necessary for Members to go through the Napier Report page by page and list the matters to be addressed, although they are many. That is an administrative task. What, however, Members need to decide, is whether such a task should be undertaken and the results brought forward for consideration by this House.

I now turn briefly to the specific role of the Chief Executive and how the report impacts upon his position. Before I do so, it might be appropriate for me to remind Members of my particular role in relation to the Napier Inquiry. Members may recall that in January this year, in view of public concerns, I asked the Chief Minister toconduct a review of the suspension process. He responded by claiming that the review


was unnecessary as it was being undertaken by the Wiltshire Constabulary. This was never the case; and in the absence of any positive action, on 2nd February I lodged a Report and Proposition – P.9/2010 – in which I requested support for a formal Committee of Inquiry into the conduct of the original suspension. I anticipated that the Inquiry would be completed within 3 months and would cost in the region of £15,000. When it became clear that my proposition may gain support, the Chief Minister offered an alternative in the form of a review by a Commissioner. This would, according to the Chief Minister, be a quicker and simpler process. Members will recall that, by 26 votes to 21, my proposal was rejected in favour of the Chief Minister’s proposal. Members may also recall that, at the suggestion of the Chief Minister, I was invited to be party to the selection process in respect of the appointment of a Commissioner; and the Chief Minister also agreed that in addition to having oversight of the selection process, in which Mr. Brian Napier QC was subsequently selected, I would also be involved with the Chief Minister in reviewing the ongoing work of the Commissioner, the reporting mechanism and the reports themselves, including the Final Report to be presented to the States in relation to the Commissioner’s work. This was intended to give me access and an insight into the Commissioner’s progress and methodology which was not commonly available. It also placed upon me, in my assessment, a duty to Members to eventually offer a view as to the manner in which the Chief Minister’s Department has managed both the review and its consequences. I had, of course, hoped that I would be able to give an assurance that I was satisfied with all of the action taken. I regret, however, that I am unable to do so because I was not consulted in the watering-down of the Terms of Reference, and I have been denied access to any of the preliminary documentation and progress reports. It was only on 17th September that I was given the Final Report in confidence. It is right, therefore, that my reservations should be shared with Members.

In relation to the specific role of the Chief Executive to the Council of Ministers, I do not believe that a detailed exploration of the relevant issues is necessary at this time. The following key points may, however, be of assistance to Members in coming to a view on how matters should now be addressed –

· The Affidavit of the former Chief Officer of Police is in the public domain and for Members’ convenience it is attached as Appendix 3. In part (d) the Terms of Reference as published in the Council of Ministers’ Comments (3) to my P.9/2010 it was intended that the Commissioner “would review all information relating to the original suspension procedure, including relevant sections of the published Affidavit from the suspended Chief Officer of Police.” However, part (d) was later withdrawn without any consultation with me or States Members. Members will note that in the sworn Affidavit the former Chief Officer describes a series of incidents which left him with a perception that the Chief Executive was seeking to politicise the role of the Chief Officer of Police. For the purposes of today it is of no consequence whether members accept that interpretation or otherwise. The point is that such a perception existed, that it was a source of tension, and that it may have carried into the consideration of the suspension process.

· It is now a matter of public record that the original record of the suspension meeting, at which the Chief Executive played a leading role, was destroyed by the Chief Executive. The former Chief Officer of Police has stated publicly that the audit-trail of correspondence appears to indicate that this destruction occurred after written notice had been given that an application was to be made to the Royal Court.

· Paragraph 45 of the Napier Report gives details of the advice of the Law Officers relating to the standard of evidence which would be required for a suspension, and in particular the warning given against the use of a report which was qualified in its conclusions. Paragraphs 69 onwards describe how this advice was not followed. In normal circumstances, an action by a senior public servant which is contrary to the advice of the Law Officers is regarded as a serious matter. Members may wish to consider whether there are reasons for taking a different view in this case.

· Paragraphs 55, 79, and elsewhere, give details of preparations for the suspension which involved the Chief Executive, and which were taking place around 2 months in advance of the suspension meeting. Mr. Napier says that there was “little objective basis” for such preparations (paragraph 80). He points out that the Disciplinary Code requires that concerns should be raised with the Chief Officer at an early stage and in the absence of any explanation from the relevant parties, Mr. Napier says “I do not know” why this was not done (paragraph 55.)

· Paragraph 70 describes how the Interim Report provided by the Metropolitan Police, which provided the justification for the suspension, was selectively used, and that key qualifications and reservations were omitted. Paragraph 93 describes how the key document, the letter from the then Deputy Chief Officer of Police was altered, apparently to strengthen its effect, and how nobody admits to making that alteration.

· Paragraph 107 describes how the Chief Executive failed to obtain a copy of the Metropolitan Police Report and how, in the view of Mr. Napier, he should have done so in order that the Minister could be properly advised.

· Overall, Mr. Napier concludes that the process was flawed, the requirements of the Disciplinary Code were not met, and that the principles of fairness were not observed. Mr. Napier is clear in his view that alternatives to suspension could and should have been considered (paragraph 108 and elsewhere). It is a matter of record that the flawed process set in chain a series of events which have resulted in substantial cost to the taxpayer. It is one of a series of highprofile, costly and seriously mismanaged disciplinary issues which have occupied the attention of Members over recent years. Members may wish to view the responsibilities of the Chief Executive in this context.

Against this background, members may consider it reasonable that the Chief Minister considers whether disciplinary action against the Chief Executive is appropriate. However, prior to this proposition, few Members will have been aware that such a measure has in fact already been considered. I became aware of this on a confidential basis on 27th September as part of my particular role, described earlier, relating to the Napier Inquiry. I agreed to maintain that confidentiality, and have continued to do so, in order that there was no undue prejudice to whatever may be determined.

Prior to the release of the Napier Report on 8th October, I had accepted that its release may be delayed due to the consideration of disciplinary issues. However, the delay caused understandable speculation, which led to a question on the matter being asked by Deputy T.M. Pitman of St. Helier at the States Sitting on 12th October (referred to below in Appendix 1). As can be seen, the Chief Minister gave a very guarded answer. Since the Report’s release, I have been concerned at the lack of information regarding the progress of the confidential disciplinary matter referred to above, and I therefore engaged in an exchange of e-mails with the Chief Minister, some of which are also attached at Appendix 1. It will also be noted that I have, on a number of occasions, sought to obtain assurances from the Chief Minister that the matter is progressing, but he has declined to provide information. On 9th October 2010, I asked that he make a statement in relation to the report and produce an action plan (e-mail attached at Appendix 2) but he has failed to respond. I am therefore left in a dilemma. Do I allow myself simply to be “fobbed off” in relation to this matter or do I bring the issue to the attention of Members? I have decided on the latter course of action.

Members are invited to take the view that matters of such gravity at such a senior level must be dealt with in a way which can be seen to be transparent and accountable. To do otherwise would invite speculation which would do little credit to our political processes. It may also further damage the confidence of victims, survivors and witnesses. In the absence of a clear statement, and plan of action, from the Chief Minister, there will inevitably be speculation, much of which will be unjustified. For example, a belief could develop that the Minister reached a proper decision in relation to disciplinary action but was then somehow persuaded to change his mind. The occasional speculation that there is a “Government within a Government” overriding the democratic process will be encouraged. Such adverse consequences can be prevented by clear leadership, decisive action and transparency. I regret that our Chief Minister has declined to act on a voluntary basis. I now ask that Members require him to do so.

Financial and manpower implications

I do not believe there will be any financial or manpower implications for the States
arising from this Proposition.

APPENDIX 1

From: Bob Hill



Sent: 19 October 2010 21:03


To: Terry Le Sueur


Subject: RE: Napier Discipline action


Dear Terry,

Thank you for reply. I can take it that you have investigated the matter and have decided to take no further action. If that is the case why can't you inform Members?

Regards

Deputy F. J. (Bob) Hill, BEM.
 
 
From: Terry Le Sueur


Sent: 19 October 2010 20:58

To: Bob Hill

Subject: RE: Napier Discipline action

Dear Bob,

I made my position clear last week regarding disciplinary action. Herewith a copy of the answer I gave to Deputy Pitman in response to his question:

As far as disciplinary action is concerned, it is a matter that I will be dealing with through normal procedures.
Any individuals must be treated fairly and with respect
and I will apply the same level of respect as would be
given any other States employee. This being the case, I do not intend making any further statement on the outcome of any such procedures.

I have investigated the disciplinary issues and I have nothing further to add.

Terry.
 
 
From: Bob Hill


Sent: 19 October 2010 19:44

To: Terry Le Sueur

Subject: FW: Napier Discipline action

Good Evening Terry,

With reference to your email below. Three weeks have now elapsed and I am no wiser as to your position re disciplinary action. I have as ever respected your wishes for confidentiality and to hope to be able to continue do so. However this is dependent on an arrangement of mutual trust between us. Therefore I would be grateful for an update as to the position in relation to disciplinary action.

Regards

Deputy F. J. (Bob) Hill, BEM.,

Deputy of St Martin.
 
APPENDIX 2
 
From: Bob Hill


Sent: 09 October 2010 14:31

To: Terry Le Sueur

Cc: All States Members (including ex officio members); 103 (103); 'Channel TV'; JEP

Editorial; News (News); Radio Jersey (Radio Jersey); Spotlight (Spotlight)

Subject: Napier-- Next Stage

Good Afternoon Terry,

Thank you for releasing the Napier Report. Unfortunately due to the timing we did not hold a joint press release or allow for anyone to question Mr Napier on his findings. Perhaps that can be arranged. I also believe you should make a statement in the States on Tuesday. You commissioned the Report, its findings clearly show that Mr Power was unfairly suspended and is therefore entitled to a public apology. I believe your statement should include the plan of action that you will be taking against those responsible for breaching the requirements of the Police Force (States) ( Jersey) Law 1974 and the Disciplinary Code made under that law. Perhaps you will also wish to consider whether the States were at any time misled in relation to the sequence of events and decision making process which was applied in this case.

Regards

Deputy F. J. (Bob) Hill, BEM.,

Deputy of St Martin.
 
APPENDIX 3
 
Appendix 3 is the sworn Affidavitt of the former Chief Police Officer Graham Power QPM which we (Team Voice) published HERE

50 comments:

  1. TLS said “As far as disciplinary action is concerned, it is a matter that I will be dealing with through normal procedures.
    Any individuals must be treated fairly and with respect
    and I will apply the same level of respect as would be
    given any other States employee. This being the case, I do not intend making any further statement on the outcome of any such procedures.”

    The former Chief of Police Graham Power was a States employee. Was his suspension dealt with through normal procedures? Did our chief minister treat him fairly and with respect? No, he treated him with contempt but hey, if that’s what he calls treating people fairly and with respect, I expect ogley and others to get the same treatment. Hang up your boots guys, you are about to be hung out to dry.

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  2. Awesome post VFC, love the pic, and lets get you guys some bigger shovels!

    ReplyDelete
  3. " It is now a matter of public record that the original record of the suspension meeting, at which the Chief Executive played a leading role, was destroyed by the Chief Executive. The former Chief Officer of Police has stated publicly that the audit-trail of correspondence appears to indicate that this destruction occurred after written notice had been given that an application was to be made to the Royal Court."

    Yeah dam right they want this put to bed, well one person does anyway.

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  4. Woh cant wait to see Ministers reaction votes on this one. Lets see how open and accountable particular Minister really want to be.

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  5. It is clear that not a single States Member should take offence at Bob Hill's proposition. He is simply asking the CM to manage his responsibilities according the rules of a fully functioning democracy. A political no brainer.

    Sadly I don't think Hill will win this one either. But listening to the arguments against it will be truly fascinating and this debate may well go down in history. Certainly students of law and politics will have a highly contentious case study to draw upon in the years ahead.

    The problem, in fact all of the problems associated with Jersey at present, are borne of either political ignorance or the desperate need to hang onto power -regardless of the cost - whether human or financial.

    I understand that in Jersey you have coined the phrase 'foot stamping lackey's' to describe a whole swathe of elected members. I sincerely hope their feet remain silent on this occasion to allow their brains some time for contemplative reflection and a proper examination of their moral obligations.

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  6. One thing it will do is point out the dead wood.

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  7. I think we know who the dead wood are, but with 12 months to an election, and the knowledge that there is a great deal of unrest and public dissatisfaction with the Chief Minister's handling of this, we may find some members actually think this through and realise that there is no honourable option but to vote for this proposition.

    Then, and only then can this affair be put to bed. Presently the sheets are very grubby.

    Good on you Bob Hill for not letting this go away.

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  8. Just Fascinating

    On the last posting on the 'ugh,it's him!' blog site he mentions some quotes by Senator Shenton

    "Senator Ben Shenton(JEP, 26th October) has really hit the nail on the head, as to why there is so much dissatisfaction with our government amongst the general public. Two telling phrases, that were worth banner headlines rather than quietly tucking away on page 9: “The States Assembly is becoming more and more irrelevant as the seat of government” and “the real decisions are made outside of the States”.

    Well Senator Shenton you now have an excellent opportunity of expressing your views even further with this proposition.

    Can you do the right thing?

    rs

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  9. Rico.

    I have witnessed with my own eyes, Senator Ben (empty seat) Shenton doing what he is told by Bill Ogley. If the good Senator does grace the States Chamber with his presence when this proposition is debated, I hope he puts any political differences aside and does the right "moral" thing.....WE SHALL SEE.

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  10. · It is now a matter of public record that the original record of the suspension meeting, at which the Chief Executive played a leading role, was destroyed by the Chief Executive. The former Chief Officer of Police has stated publicly that the audit-trail of correspondence appears to indicate that this destruction occurred after written notice had been given that an application was to be made to the Royal Court.

    So the suspension took place on the 12th november. vfc do you know when the chief made that application to the royal court? did the chief sign off the notes that were eventually typed up.

    My shout on the vote will be 35 to 13 with a certain housing minister sneaking out the backdoor

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  11. "did the chief sign off the notes that were eventually typed up."

    As far as I recall the typed up notes of the suspension meeting were not signed off by the Chief Police Officer.

    I believe they were signed off by Bill Ogley and Andrew Lewis, but am not 100% certain.

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  12. Where is Frank Walker in the picture?

    ReplyDelete
  13. "Where is Frank Walker in the picture?"

    Going by the look on Bill Ogley's face, I could probably guess

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  14. Members are invited to take the view that matters of such gravity at such a senior level must be dealt with in a way which can be seen to be transparent and accountable. To do otherwise would invite speculation which would do little credit to our political processes. It may also further damage the confidence of victims, survivors and witnesses. In the absence of a clear statement, and plan of action, from the Chief Minister, there will inevitably be speculation, much of which will be unjustified. For example, a belief could develop that the Minister reached a proper decision in relation to disciplinary action but was then somehow persuaded to change his mind. The occasional speculation that there is a “Government within a Government” overriding the democratic process will be encouraged. Such adverse consequences can be prevented by clear leadership, decisive action and transparency. I regret that our Chief Minister has declined to act on a voluntary basis. I now ask that Members require him to do so.

    Will the members "require him to do so?"

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  15. I am taking it this would be one of those real decisions made outside of the States a la Shenton style?

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  16. I would be shocked horrified if anyone voted against this.

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  17. VFC

    The chief exec started making enquiries about suspending mr power in september 2008 did this coincide with the Attorney General dropping so many cases. My guess is that had it not been for wendy kinnard he would have gone in late september early march.

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  18. Walker's the one cowering inbetween Wierdcop and Le Meekone!

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  19. From Deputy Hill's Report.

    "All sides hope to bring this long-running issue to an end. In this respect I have a plan set out in this proposition. The Chief Minister prefers to hope for it to go away. It should be recalled that this is the same Chief Minister who denied the former Police Chief details of when the suspension letters were drafted, until, after almost a year, he was compelled to reveal the truth following a Board of Administration Appeal Hearing".

    There is yet another pivotal qustion...or two.

    How can Terry Le Sueur claim to be neutral in this after doing all that he could to prevent Graham Power QPM from getting the dates of when his suspension letters were created? And WHY DID HE PREVENT HIM FROM FINDING OUT THESE DATES?

    It stinks Terry, it all stinks.

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  20. THE RAG has let a letter in its todays edition which makes you wonder who is the senior civil servant "pulling the p~~s". Ihen again who is the only senior civil servant who has the power to hold the entire Jersey Government to ransom?

    Give you a clue....
    His initials give a bad smell!!?

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  21. Call me a cynic but I think this is where those secret police files will place great weight on the voting.

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  22. DOH???

    KING BIRT???

    WHAT!!!

    Wrong???

    ReplyDelete
  23. from the 2nd feb 2009

    4.15.2          The Deputy of St. Martin:
    I heard the Chief Minister say that the typed document was signed by obviously the Chief Officer and also by the Minister and passed on to the 3 people involved.  But was the draft signed by the third person involved?  In other words, did the third person agree with what had been typed?

    Senator T.A. Le Sueur:
    In view of the fact that the matter is still under consideration from a disciplinary point of view, I do not think it would be appropriate for me to comment on the reaction of the suspended Chief Officer.

    (Then later on in the same exchange we have this)

    4.15.6          The Deputy of St. John:
    I refer back to a yes or no answer; did the 3 people concerned all sign the document?

    The Deputy Bailiff:
    That has already been asked, Deputy.
    The Deputy of St. John:
    It was not answered, Sir. 

    The Deputy Bailiff:
    It is up to the Chief Minister whether he wants to change his answer.

    Senator T.A. Le Sueur:
    The document was signed by the Chief Executive and the Minister for Home Affairs, it was not signed and it would not be expected to be signed by the suspended Chief Officer.

    Is that correct procedure?

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  24. Coming from a group that swept the Wiltshire Report under the carpet more hipocritical nonsence.

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  25. "Coming from a group that swept the Wiltshire Report under the carpet more hipocritical nonsence."

    It must have escaped that readers attention but we have Blogged extensively on the Wiltshire Report.

    We will, in the very near future, be Blogging even more extensively on the Wiltshire Report that's hardly brushing it under the carpet.

    If anybody has brushed it under the carpet then that must be the "accredited" media....watch this space, there is plenty more to come of the (up to) NINETY PER CENT REDACTED wiltshire Report.

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  26. If they cant offer a proper heart felt apology to the victims of child abuse then what chance does graham power have of receiving one.

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  27. Now will Deputy P LE Claire stand up and tell all the states members what he herd.

    Will Senator Shenton now stand up and tell all members how the real power is outside the chamber.

    P166/2010 is calling out the states members.

    Are they prepared to sit there and suck on the teat of power or stand up for Jersey and start ridding us of the lunacy

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  28. Brushing the Wiltshire Report under the carpet.

    Team Voice have published NINE "BRIEFING NOTES" concerning the Wiltshire Report. On top of that we have published a Blog asking if the Report was "value for money?"

    We published a two part interview with Deputy Trevor Pitman HERE AND HERE

    So that's at least 12 Blog postings we have published on the Wiltshire Report. We have (as can be see on the first link above) made contact with the Wiltshire Constabulary in order to get the facts and truth out, but they won't give us them.

    And like I said in the earlier comment, we will be publishing alot more on the Wiltshire Report. So the commenter and others can rest assured, if anybody is going to try and brush the Wiltshire Report under the carpet.....it won't be, and hasn't been Team Voice.

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  29. Someone asked if le claire would tell the chamber what he heard in the corridors of power.

    Well he has a golden chance now

    rs

    ReplyDelete
  30. TLS replied to Bob Hill "Any individuals must be treated fairly and with respect"

    Oh yes my little manic hamster - as long as they are friends of yours, your perceived equals or your perceived betters!

    The rest of us plebs, no-marks, and abuse survivors are not treated fairly or with any respect at all.

    Great post and picture VFC. I suspect FW is under the covers with his hand up a few puppets' backs (or worse)

    Lorna

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  31. will we see a record number of non attendees, bottlers or conveniently off the Island and will Mr. Le Claire be one of them me personally am interested in how Mr. Southern votes?

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  32. Lorna.

    Credit for the picture must go to IAN. It was his creation and it is a great piece of work.

    As for TLS saying "Any individuals must be treated fairly and with respect". It is a pitty he didn't apply this to the survivors of unthinkable Child Abuse at our State run institutions or Graham Power QPM.

    The truth is coming......and it's going to hurt.

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  33. Accountability of Government

    Ministers should be more accountable to the people of Jersey and to the States.

    Unfortunately ministerial government has not worked as well as I and many of the people of Jersey had hoped. This is due partly to the fact that some bad decisions have been made by individual ministers and partly due to the lack of accountability of ministers to the States as a whole and therefore to the electorate.
    .
    I do not believe that we can long continue with the present situation in which the people of Jersey have no effective say as to who will be the next Chief Minister and other Ministers.

    The present electoral system means that once individuals have been elected to the States (which includes Senators for 6 years) they do not have to pay much attention to the views of the public until just before their next election date (if they are standing again). Furthermore, it is the members of the States who decide who will be the Chief Minister and the other ministers and the public have almost no say on this. It cannot be right that a person can be chosen as the Chief Minister without their popularity having been tested at a recent election.

    On the other hand, a system in which the people of the Island would directly elect the Chief Minister would not work because the Chief Minister under a parliamentary democracy must generally command a majority in the States. Such a system belongs as part of a presidential system as exists in the U.S.A. and in France. I do not think that the people of Jersey would want such a system because it gives much too much power to one person.

    Ultimately, if the people of Jersey want to have more say as to who actually governs
    them, they will have to start supporting a form of politics which has room both for independent members and for group or party politics.

    Guess Who?

    ReplyDelete
  34. I believe that I have a reputation for fairness, honesty and directness. I am passionate about my Island home and community and its historic culture and traditions but I have always been a reformer, seeking to take what we have and improve it gradually.

    Have you guessed yet?

    ReplyDelete
  35. My first guess is ILM. The very man that was once repected as a fair Magistrate, but has (in my opinion) lost all sense of justice since being "anointed" as Home Affairs Minister.

    The very same man who wants to be our next Cheif Minister, but due to his disgaceful handling of the Graham Power QPM case has lost any chance he might have had.

    The same chap who it appears thinks the "accredited" media should be given reports before his fellow States Members.

    Did I get it right? And while I'm at it, didn't he once say (before he got elected) something along the lines that there was no-one in the States capable of being Chief Minister?

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  36. Correct

    Blue Peter Badge for the Voice

    Can someone explain what happened to this man

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  37. It’s another one of those strange coincidences. Right in the middle of a high profile Child Abuse investigation the island’s (respected) Magistrate decides to take a 70k pay drop and runs for election and becomes the Home Affairs Minister. Treats our most Senior Police Officer worse than a criminal, and denies him the right to a fair hearing.

    But not only does he deny the former Police Chief a fair hearing, he publishes the very redacted “prosecution case” against him and not a single word of the defence case. All very strange……….“What happened to him?” At a mere guess, I would say that he sold his soul.

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  38. Question please. who authorised the Wiltshire report and on what day for what purpose.

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  39. vfc could you let me know why my comment was not approved?

    ReplyDelete
  40. Martin.

    I do apologise, I did mean to leave a comment for you about it.

    There was a comment in there that might be construed as advocating violence. I am sure you meant the “shooting” bit metaphorically but it wasn’t made that clear in the comment itself.

    If you would like to re-submit the comment making it clear you were speaking metaphorically I will be happy to publish it. Sorry I forgot to mention it earlier.

    ReplyDelete
  41. Lets face it. These days could you really see Senator Ian Le Marquand trying to selling his soul to the thousand plus working people present at Fort Regent last Summer?

    The only Senator at that meeting that evening, who was given the benefit of the doubt, by the fuming crowd there, who could have torn him to threads, but didnt?

    He has now without doubt proved his complete naivety, ignorance, and foolishness, in his latest and well recorded behaviour!

    Shame on you Senator. The crowd is very, very, disappointed!

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  42. thank you vfc for your reply i did mean it metaphorically but as i said frist time nothing will come of d,hill proposition with the spineless states members we have there are but a handfull you can vote for they are going on about smoking in cars, schools just so people doint see what is relly going on tls will have he,s way no matter what iv seen more backbone in a jellyfish then most of our states members

    ReplyDelete
  43. [nothing will come of d,hill proposition]

    Perhaps not in the way one would normally expect!

    However, whatever happens, it is right that Deputy Hill, does ask those very important questions, even if we have to listen to a Chief Minister, evade, distract and respond in a very undemocratic manner, some would say the man's (TLS) an idiot, many would agree!

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  44. You would believe Ministers would want to support accountability and openness.

    What concerns me is any fear or pressure ministers may come up against with regard measures that may have been put in place ie(secret police files on ministers)

    held as bargaining power by a select few.

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  45. ILM was also reported to have told a few people that he was going to be the next Home Afairs Minister.
    This was before he was even elected into the States.
    What a disaster this man has been, but maybe not in some eyes, perhaps in some circles he has done a fine job, the job that he was set up to do.

    The man has sold his sole and even the Alpha sect will not save him ,where he will end up.

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  46. ILM a respected magistrate, thats one way of looking at it,
    another is to realise that all 'our' magistrates are lawyers,
    therefor they know the quasi nature of the court system, and have no moral problem in deceiving the people into contracting with them

    our ignorance makes this childs play

    visit 'our' magistrates court for the afternoon session and see for yourselves, a well oiled,slick
    revenue operation in action

    ma baker said to Stuart- this is a court of law,young man, not a court of justice

    excuse me for being an upperty pleb, but, a lawful courts business is truth and justice,
    nothing else

    power tends to corrupt,absolute power.....

    quasi criminal,pull the other one

    wake up people or get used to more of the same

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  47. VFC

    That was some "talkcrap" this morning. We are in serious need of some help.

    ReplyDelete
  48. To be honest with you I don't see how this week's Talkback was anything different from any other week.

    It was "safe" and "fluffy" skirted around the edges and the minute it looked like it might or could get to anything that resembles controversial good old Christie hit the cut off button, and silenced the very man who could have given us the inside story, former health minister Stuart Syvret.

    Just another "fluffy" and "giggly" little chat, one expects nothing more from Talkback..... or BBC Jersey for that matter.

    ReplyDelete
  49. SHENTON DO THE RIGHT THING? DON'T BE DAFT, RICO. SHENTON IS ONLY INTERESTED IN SOUND BITES AND CHEAP PUBLICITY. A COMPLETE WASTE OF TIME. MAYBE HE MEANS BY SAYING THAT THE REAL DECISIONS ARE TAKEN OUTSIDE OF THE STATES THAT EVERYTHING HAPPENS AT HIS OFFICE? I MEAN, HE IS HARDLY EVER IN THE STATES BEFORE THE MORNING PRAYERS HAVE STOPPED ECHOING AROUND THE CHAMBER OR DID SOMEONE GIVE HIM A CLOAK OF INVISIBILITY LAST CHRISTMAS? VOTE THIS BOZO OUT IN 2011!

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  50. A WORD OF CAUTION to those fighting injustice in Jersey.

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